Three days after a federal jury ruled that Katy Perry's 2013 hit "Dark Horse" had improperly copied another artist's song, the singer was hit with sizable damages. During a hearing on Thursday to determine damages, a jury found that Perry and her musical collaborators, including producer Dr. Luke, who worked with her on the single, will have to pay $2.78 million. The jury awarded the sizable sum to Christian rapper Marcus Gray -- who performs under the stage name "Flame" -- and his two co-writers on the 2009 single "Joyful Noise" -- the song that a jury decided Perry's tune had significantly copied.
Just when you thought Fast and Furious couldn't get more daring, screenwriter Chris Morgan has said that the film series might see Vin Diesel's Dominic Toretto and the gang travel to space one day. In an interview with Polygon, veteran Morgan – who has written seven of the nine outings within the franchise, including the upcoming spin-off Hobbs and Shaw – admitted that "nothing’s out of the question" when asked whether we could see our heroes operating rocket ships instead of cars in the future. "It just has to be cool and it has to be good," he explained. "You know, that’s the thing. I would say nothing is off-limits as long as we can stay on the right side of keeping the audience engaged."
Fans of Quentin Tarantino have spent decades scouring his movies for everything from Easter Eggs to homages to classic or contemporary cinema to self-referential nods to his own films. Some of these allusions are obvious, some are more subtle, and anyone who looks closely enough might notice the threads connecting all of Quentin Tarantino's movies together. Take for example the dinner scene at Jack Rabbit Slims in Pulp Fiction: Mia Wallace, played by Uma Thurman, explains the plot of a TV pilot she was in. Her description of a group of female secret agents sounds oddly familiar if you've ever seen another Quentin Tarantino film called Kill Bill. Wallace says that she played a character—Raven McCoy—who was the deadliest woman in the world with a knife (the description given to Thurman's character in Kill Bill). And, of course, during the Pulp Fiction scene Wallace is talking to Vincent Vega, a character who shares the last name, and is related to, Mr. Blonde (a nickname given to the character Victor Vega) from Reservoir Dogs. There are also brands that pop up throughout Tarantino's movies like Big Kahuna Burger and Red Apple Cigarettes. And if you look closely, Crazy Craig Koons in Django Unchained is an ancestor of Captain Koons, Christopher Walken's Pulp Fiction character. Pete Hicox, Tim Roth's character in The Hateful Eight is related to Michael Fassbender's Archie Hicox in Inglourious Basterds. Tarantino himself confirmed the existence of this shared universe in 2017, explaining to an Australian news outlet: There's the realer than real universe, alright, and all the characters inhabit that one. But then there's this movie universe. And so From Dusk Till Dawn, Kill Bill, they all take place in this special movie universe. So basically when the characters of Reservoir Dogs or Pulp Fiction, when they go to the movies, Kill Bill is what they go to see. From Dusk Till Dawn is what they see. So by that logic, the hierarchy of the Tarantino shared universe works as so: The Realer Than Real World Universe includes: Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, Pulp Fiction, Death Proof, Inglourious Basterds, Django Unchained, and The Hateful Eight. The Movie Movie Universe includes: Natural Born Killers, From Dusk Till Dawn, and Kill Bill.
Queen's 1975 hit Bohemian Rhapsody has become the first pre-1990s music video to reach one billion plays on YouTube. The six-minute long promo, which is often hailed as a pioneering example of the music video, hit the milestone over the weekend. YouTube bosses claim it is the first song released before the 1990s to make the milestone. To celebrate, the band is releasing a newly remastered high definition version of the clip on their YouTube channel on Monday and are also launching a project titled You Are the Champions, allowing fans the opportunity to take part in three new user-generated videos. "We are honoured that Bohemian Rhapsody has just hit one billion views on YouTube," bandmates Brian May and Roger Taylor said in a statement posted on their website. Inviting fans to take part in their new project, they added: "We want to thank you all and celebrate with our amazing fans all around the world by creating three new music videos to our songs, all featuring you! Whether you are a musician, singer, dancer, visual artist or you just want to have some fun. Go to www.youarethechampions.com to find out more and we'll see you on the road somewhere." Their initiative allows singers and instrumentalists to submit their take on Bohemian Rhapsody, dancers can work on a video for Don't Stop Me Now, and visual artists have been asked to design any word or phrase from the lyrics to A Kind of Magic. Queen's YouTube channel will feature the finished fan videos later this year. The band's already immense popularity received a boost following the success of their biopic, also titled Bohemian Rhapsody, which debuted last October, made more than $900 million (£720 million) at the box office and won four Oscars, including a Best Actor prize for Rami Malek's portrayal of frontman Freddie Mercury.

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